How well do you know your network? Part 2

Business assets such as PC’s, laptops and mobile phones are pretty common; it’s highly unusual where you start a new job and don’t get assigned at least 1 of these devices in order to carry out your duties for that company. In some cases, users are welcome to bring their own device if preferred. All of these devices however can bring threats to your LAN and to your business in not secured and managed properly. 
Business assets such as PC’s, laptops and mobile phones are pretty common; it’s highly unusual where you start a new job and don’t get assigned at least 1 of these devices in order to carry out your duties for that company. In some cases, users are welcome to bring their own device if preferred. All of these devices however can bring threats to your LAN and to your business in not secured and managed properly. 

The most common form of securing a mobile asset, such as a laptop, is via a mobile device management (MDM) solution. In a nutshell and MDM solution provides IT administrators with “control” over that device – using pre-set configurations, they are able to limit non-admin level users from certain settings on the device itself or from installing unauthorised programmes, schedule firmware/software updates and backup or secure data, along with a myriad of other functions such as remote monitoring and troubleshooting. 

Furthermore, should a device leave the company premises and be inadvertently lost or stolen, an MDM tool allows a business to remotely wipe the local data stored on that device. Similarly, should an asset in some way become compromised, such as by becoming infected with a virus via connecting to an alternative, less secure network, unusual behaviour would be alerted to the IT administrator, who can take quick preventative measures to isolate that device from the rest of the network.  

Asset security is imperative in the fight against Cyber crime and to keep your business safe during day to day operations. As mentioned in part 1, 43% of all breaches are caused by “insider threats” – I would imagine the majority of these are completely unintentional, but caused by compromised devices being connected to a companies private network, introducing something that has been carried in externally, thus bypassing all the rigorous checks and balances applied by a networks edge security appliance.